DRIVING IN THE RAIN – STREET DANGERS IN NEPAL.

Driving in conditions that involve strong or heavy wind and rain may not seem like the most pressing safety concern for many drivers, but our safety professionals know that driving in any type of severe weather can significantly increase your risk and potential for a dangerous situation for you, your family and other drivers. Remember that severe weather demands your undivided attention, so be sure to reduce any possible distractions by turning the radio down or turning off that phone to keep your attention fully on the road. Keep in mind that sometimes the best driving decision you can make is to stay off the road completely until the weather clears.

Driving in Heavy Rain is more dangerous. In addition to the potentially poor visibility that accompanies most heavy rain, drivers should be ready to protect themselves against hydroplaning. Hydroplaning can occur when a vehicle is traveling too fast in heavy rain conditions, causing the vehicle’s tires to travel on a thin layer of water rather than grip the surface of the road. This has the potential to make steering and braking difficult and could even lead to losing control of your vehicle. Follow these tips to help you stay safe while driving in heavy rain.

1. Take your time. Slowing down is the only way to keep your vehicle from hydroplaning. Also remember that one of the most dangerous times to drive is soon after it begins to rain, as oils on roadway make for slick conditions. Waiting a few minutes, rather than rushing to your destination, can be a safer plan when it is raining.

2. Turn your lights on. Turn your headlights on to help other vehicles see you. Many states require the use of headlights during rain, even in broad daylight.

3. Give other vehicles more space. Add 1-2 extra seconds of following time in the rain, which gives you and the cars behind you more time to react to traffic.


Driving in Heavy Winds is morer dangerous on the streets of NepalWind may seem like a minor risk, but this weather condition deserves special consideration from drivers. Strong wind can occur just about anywhere, but it can be more common in wide open spaces. Areas for concern also include highway overpasses, tunnels and ‘road cuts’ through mountainous areas that can act as funnels for wind. The following tips can help keep you on the road and safe if you encounter heavy winds.

1. Anticipate gusts. Take special care when driving through areas prone to strong winds or when weather reports predict severe weather.

2. Notice larger vehicles. Be aware of large vehicles on the road such as tractor-trailers and recreational vehicles. They are more susceptible to high winds and drivers may have difficulties staying in their lanes.

3. Keep a firm grip on the wheel. Keep both hands on the wheel in case the wind begins to move your vehicle, especially if you are driving a large vehicle or towing a trailer.

Driving in Heavy Rain is more dangerous. In addition to the potentially poor visibility that accompanies most heavy rain, drivers should be ready to protect themselves against hydroplaning. Hydroplaning can occur when a vehicle is traveling too fast in heavy rain conditions, causing the vehicle’s tires to travel on a thin layer of water rather than grip the surface of the road. This has the potential to make steering and braking difficult and could even lead to losing control of your vehicle. Follow these tips to help you stay safe while driving in heavy rain.

1. Take your time. Slowing down is the only way to keep your vehicle from hydroplaning. Also remember that one of the most dangerous times to drive is soon after it begins to rain, as oils on roadway make for slick conditions. Waiting a few minutes, rather than rushing to your destination, can be a safer plan when it is raining.

2. Turn your lights on. Turn your headlights on to help other vehicles see you. Many states require the use of headlights during rain, even in broad daylight.

3. Give other vehicles more space. Add 1-2 extra seconds of following time in the rain, which gives you and the cars behind you more time to react to traffic.


Driving in the rain presents greater danger than driving in wintry snow and ice.That’s right.  You know how some people go crazy when the snow flies.  Officials warn everyone to stay off the roads due to snow and ice.  Grocery stores fill up with shoppers grabbing milk, bread and everything else needed for a homebound spell. But is rain really worse than hazards presented by winter snow and ice? Is hydroplaning … sliding along on pools of water … the only rain related danger?Can a person who slides across the road on wet pavement blame the rain for causing the accident?

HYDROPLANING:

Hydroplaning occurs when a vehicle’s speed causes it’s tires to lift off the roadway.  The vehicle’s tires then travel on a layer of water rather than griping the road surface. With as little as 1/12 inch of water on the road, tires need to displace a gallon of water per second to keep the rubber meeting the road.  If it sounds impossible, its why a car hydroplanes even on smaller amounts of water on the roadway.

HYDROPLANING IS NOT THE ONLY WET ROADWAY HAZARD:

You know all those patches of oil in nearly every parking lot, underneath where the engines of parked cars are?  It’s obviously from oil dripping from the engine area.  Imagine the hundreds and thousands of cars traveling on the highways we all use every day. Even if each car drips only a tiny amount of oil it adds up.  Multiplied by the number of cars, and the roads are covered with a thin sheen of oil, even if you can’t see it.  When it rains, the water on top of the thin layer of oil combines to create an extremely slippery surface. The longer it has been since the last rainfall, the worse the danger of this oil-water combo.    That’s why slower speeds are highly recommended even in very light rain.  Having pursued car accident cases for many years, I’ve heard it time after time, the negligent driver “had no idea” the road surface could be that slippery. But the oil slick danger creates what accident analysts call a condition, and not the cause of an accident.

DON’T BLAME THE RAIN FOR AN ACCIDENT:

If you’ve been rear-ended by someone who blames the wet rainy road, don’t buy it.  All drivers have a duty to use what the law calls “reasonable care” to avoid causing danger to others on the road.  That means driving safely under all of the existing conditions, in view of the serious consequences that might occur for failure to do so. The rules of the road in every districts of Nepal that we’ve looked at require drivers to drive safely under all existing circumstances.  Rain and the obvious reduced ability to brake normally present one of those conditions.

RAINY DAYS AND BAD DRIVERS:

There’s an old song about “Rainy Days and Mondays” always getting you down.  But no matter what day it is rain creates tough driving conditions and, if not taken seriously by the driver, makes bad drivers even worse. When it comes to insurance companies when they want to lowball your case, they’ll apply all of the above as it suits their needs.  If their insured driver was going too fast for conditions but under the posted speed limit they’ll whine that their driver was going within the posted limit.  This is wrong because as we’ve seen above, the law requires drivers to slow down in the rain. Some drivers who caused an accident claim they didn’t know the road was so slippery and it was an unforeseen condition, not a cause of the accident.  Insurance companies actually buy into this bogus defense attempting to pay as little or nothing as possible.  But all of the above information is in virtually every driver’s manual in America.  Road hazards caused by rain and other bad weather are foreseeable.  Failing to take foreseeable risks into account is the definition of negligence.

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